What Is the Female Orgasm For? And Female Ejaculation?

Into every life a little science must fall – even if you don’t really want it! But we can turn to science for an understanding of the purpose of the female orgasm, and the female ejaculation which can accompany orgasm.

So What’s Female Orgasm For?

Orgasm during intercourse
What is female orgasm for?

Specifically, the question we want an answer to is this: “What is the purpose of the female orgasm?”

Indeed. Orgasm isn’t necessary for a woman to get pregnant, so what function does it serve? It’s not like male orgasm which is necessary for a man to impregnate a woman.

The first idea is that orgasm is simply a way of drawing semen into the uterus.

The orgasmic contractions of the vagina may ensure that sperm is drawn nearer the point of conception. Semen may be either sucked up into the uterus through the cervix, or drawn into the deeper recesses of the vagina. From there, it’s more likely that sperm will be able to travel through the cervix and into the uterus.

One of the things which supports this are studies on flowback. (That’s what seeps out of the vagina after sex.)

We know that when women achieve orgasm more or less at the same time as the man who is making love to them, flowback contains less sperm. Compared, that is, to flowback in women who don’t reach orgasm or who reach orgasm much sooner than the man with whom they are having sex.

Now that’s clear, but it doesn’t necessarily mean that aiding conception by encouraging semen retention is the function of the female orgasm – it’s only a hypothesis.

And indeed, if the purpose of the female orgasm was to ensure women became pregnant more easily, then surely many more women would reach orgasm during vaginal sex? Indeed, wouldn’t Mother Nature have provided a mechanism for this to happen automatically?

The second theory about the purpose of the female orgasm is rather peculiar – the suggestion being that it’s a way of enabling the woman to select a better quality mate.

laughing man and woman in bed
More orgasms indicates a better quality mate? Who knew?

This rather odd conclusion is based on studies of college women.

They seem to have more orgasms when they are having sex with men who have certain “higher status” attributes. Believe it or not, women have more orgasms with men who have a higher family income.

And there’s more! Other qualities which lead to more orgasms include greater physical attractiveness. And also, a woman who feels she is “being protected by her partner” or who “feels that her partner is a catch” will also have more orgasms. And also, it seems, “having a partner with broader shoulder width” is a stimulus to orgasmic bliss.

Now it just so happens that these are characteristics which indicate high “mate value”. In other words, they are signs of males who are a good catch. They have qualities which indicate they are more likely to be able to provide an environment in which children can survive and flourish.

In short, if women have more orgasms when making love to “quality men”, then perhaps having more orgasms is a factor in influencing women’s choice of mate.

And I guess women have more orgasms when they are more turned on. So the real issue here might be how sexually aroused a woman is by her partner.

The logic goes like this: women are more turned on by a man with greater financial wealth and good looks, so they have more orgasms. And when they have more orgasms, they instinctively know they have a better quality man. And this implies a survival advantage for the children.

And third theory is that female orgasm is just a “bonus”. A simple remnant from our evolution. Because the male and female genitals have the same embryonic origin, there’s got to be the potential for woman to reach orgasm hardwired into her body.

So perhaps, like the male nipple, the female orgasm is just an evolutionary quirk.

There are plenty of other theories of course. Maybe orgasm is a reward for having sex. That might serve the propagation of the species. Or maybe it has a role in pair bonding. That would keep a couple together.

In short, we just don’t really know.

And The Function Of Women Ejaculating?

This article describes some possible functions of female ejaculation. Female ejaculation comes from the Skene’s glands, which are made up of tissue also known as the “female prostate”.

They produce a viscous white secretion which comes out of the urethra when women are sexually excited – particularly when they reach orgasm.

It’s been called female ejaculate by Beverly Whipple, who was involved in the discovery of the G spot. When it’s chemically analyzed, this secretion is completely different to urine. So there’s no doubt it does NOT come from the bladder.

To be clear: what we are calling female ejaculate comes from the Skene’s glands during female ejaculation. By contrast, fluid which is squirted, or which gushes, from the urethra may come from the bladder.

Female ejaculate contains chemical components found in male semen, including creatinine, PSA or prostate specific antigen, prostatic acid phosphatase, zinc and glucose.

We are not sure what function female ejaculate serves, but it has survived our evolution.

What is the function of the female orgasm
Greater mate quality, better orgasms, protection from infection… so many theories, so little evidence!

So it might simply be a remnant of embryonic prostatic tissue in women – something similar to the male nipple.

But because it’s a biological or evolutionary structure which has NOT been selected out of the human physiology over the millenia of our evolution, maybe it has a purpose.

And indeed, it’s possible that female ejaculation does have an identifiable function.

Maybe the ejaculate, the secretion from the Skene’s glands, protects the female urethra from UTIs (urinary tract infection).

This would certainly be credible if it we could prove that female ejaculate contained antimicrobial compounds and other substances such as zinc which are known to inhibit bacterial growth. (No proof of that yet, I’m sorry to say.)

But maybe it’s not such a big step to believing that the female prostatic tissue or Skene’s glands were retained during evolution because of their advantageous effect on bacterial growth in the urethra.

The advantage being, in short, that women who could ejaculate fluid like this are less likely to suffer UTIs.

As all women know, UTIs can be easily produced by sexual intercourse. And obviously women without UTIs are likely to be healthier, likely to want more sex more often, and therefore more likely to become pregnant.

If you look at it in these terms, then there’s definitely some sort of evolutionary advantage to female ejaculation. But we don’t know for sure…  And as always, not knowing what it’s for does not stop it feeling good!